Skip navigation
Library

The Bloody Runes written on the floor.

10 replies [Last post]
DREMORA KYNMARCHER's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/12/2010

Does anyone know the translation or where I may be able to find a translation of The Bloody Runes written on the floor of The chapel of Dibella in Anvil? It's during the attack on the chapel,(In The Knights of The Nine) and Umaril's Aurorans write these runes in blood.

Bibliophael's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/03/2011

Ash nazg durbatulûk, ash nazg gimbatul

Ash nazg thrakatulûk, agh burzum-ishi krimpatul

 

Lady N's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/26/2010

UESP has it as "As oiobala Umarile, Ehlnada racuvar," which translates to "by the eternal power of Umaril, the mortal gods shall be cast down." I've not checked, but that sounds right. 

Pilaf The Defiler's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/27/2010

Lady N wrote:

UESP has it as "As oiobala Umarile, Ehlnada racuvar," which translates to "by the eternal power of Umaril, the mortal gods shall be cast down." I've not checked, but that sounds right. 

 

Your version sounds more correct. I played through Knights of the Nine again last week and it's fresh on my memory.

 

This begs the old question again, though. Just how did Umaril plan to "cast down the mortal gods?" It's not clear just how Ayleid sorcery works, but we know their abilities were frightening at the height of their power. Pelinal had to lay a powerful curse on the remains of Gorbash the Shaper just to keep him from rebuilding himself with Welkynd Magic. (For all we know, that spell may wear off after so many eras...Gorbash would be an interesting future villain, another Ayleid back from the dead.)

 

As far as the game mechanics as presented to us, the altars in the churches that Umaril successfully desecrated stopped working, at least until new priests moved in. Perhaps his plan was to sever the connection between mortals and Divines by laying some kind of Ayleid hex on the places of worship and perhaps even the wayshrines if his plans had continued. His eventual goal, I would guess, would be to regin access to White Gold Tower and somehow use its power to resape the Divine in Cyrodill, possibly reinstating the Ayleid pantheon or using some lost magic to draw the Ayleid blood out of the Mer populations, like Umbacano tried to do with the crown and welkynd stones.

 

Those are my best guesses based on all the Ayleid lore I've read. I think it would actually be technically possible for him to achieve all those things, especially if his agents had hidden away the Crusader's Relics in time, which they failed to do. The changing the face of the Divine was achieved before by the Marakhuti Selectives. This could be reverse engineered by a similar ritual of Ayleid design, I'm guessing.

 

 

The whole hypothesis I've been rattling around in my head for the last year or two is that the White Gold Tower acts as some kind of restart button or maybe construction set in Tamriel,and those who properly bind themselves to it are able to literally reshape the land or even the Divine to some degree, as Talos did when he changed Cyrodill from jungle to temperate grasslands. I'm assuming Vuhon knows something about how it works as well, which will probably be explained more in Lord of Souls. Keeping the "White Gold is construction set" idea in mind, it seems Umaril could have quite literally brought back the Ayleids if he'd managed to fulfill his plans.

Proweler's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/14/2010

Wow. Bit of a rant there.

 

Godkilling:

I don't know how he'd envision killing the mortal gods.

But considering that the Aedra are given shape by the collective memory of them imprinted on a shrizophrenic skinball (e.g. Mundus) killing all the priests and desecrating all the altars sounds like a good start.

 

 

Gordhaur the Shaper:

That is, unless those others do not come from this world at all, and are instead spirits of the Far Shores or the In-Between-- against these gods and demons and mad shapers, all men can be humbled. But is that not the point?

 

So I can't help but think it's a reference to Transformers.

 

White Gold:

 

"CHIM. Those who know it can reshape the land. Witness the home of the Red King Once Jungled."

I think you're confusing Whitegold with Chim. Though I don't mean to say that Chim is the construction set.

Pilaf The Defiler's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/27/2010

I don't believe I'm completely unjustified in my belief that White Gold and possibly the other Towers act as sorts of conduits. The pre existing lore supports this, as well as the hints that Keyes is giving us that it would have the ability to free Vuhon and Umbra from Oblivion. I think Talos having CHIM simply made it easier for him to access and manipulate the abilities of the White Gold Tower.

 

I tend to think Umaril and Umbacano had plans to actually literally revive the Ayleid Empire. It wasn't just some wild ambition to cause random havoc, raise armies of undead and daedra and terrorize Imperial citizens. They seemed confident in their ability to literally and physically revive the Ayleid culture. That would be some deep magic indeed and probably involve a Dragon Break or something of similar scale, but there's a precedent in the lore for that kind of shaping of the mythical. It would be especially something Umaril would have knowledge of being not only a former acting Chieftan of the Ayleids, but the son of a God and bound to a Daedric realm. He would have deep and fundamental knowledge of the manipulation of Towers and things, especially the one he used to lord over.

YH
YH's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/28/2010

Proweler wrote:

So I can't help but think it's a reference to Transformers.

Squee if so.

Od
Od's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/02/2010

This is all Umaril hears. You want to know what he's about, where his rants arive from... petty violence revolt, hatred, rebellion (not quite petty, eh?). But petty violence hurts, and the Year of Razors was a real bitch.

 

He could have been a lot cooler, if he wasn't just some space invader, but whose avatar appeared within the populace of the marginalized, then his revolt escalated inside the Imperial Cult. Same with Mankar, I guess. Ha, here I am again, pining for the better Oblivion topics...

Pilaf The Defiler's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/27/2010

I agree they could have done much more with all their villains in TES IV. Mankar was a fascinating character with a very interesting family history, but you have to be the kind of player to read through lots of in game books to understand just who he is or where he comes from .The story as presented is inadequate. Even more so for the King of Worms.

 

Umaril was very interesting as well, and a waste of potential, if you refer to my ideas above. I believe the devs had similar ideas for what he was planning, at least a rough sketch, in the background, but to appreciate the Ayleid menace you have to be the kind of player to read lots of books. Not just the new ones from the DLC although they were awesome as well, but a lot of the ones you pick up during the main quest. Umbacano is another interesting example I already named. Playing through that storyline is a good setup for the Knights of the Nine thing because you already learn how deceptive and powerful an Ayleid can be, even a descendent of weaker blood.

 

Then there's some of the lesser villains who were frankly nearly just as entertaining. The guy who wanted revenge on the Black Hand left one of the most amusing journals I've ever read. The leader of the Blackwood Company and his second and third in command have some very interesting lore dialogue concerning Khajiit and Argonian social customs. The average player might not choose to talk to them at all, but I'm glad I did. I learned some interesting terminology and lore that surprised me. Learned a LOT of interesting things during the Thieves Guild main storyline, especially about Elder Scrolls and how they can literally rewrite history or even the future. It's interesting to note that when Dareloth used the Cowl of Nocturnal his name was stricken from the pages of history. It's similar to how nobody can seem to remember exactly the names, races or genders of the past heroes of Tamriel. It's almost as if their names have been edited out of the Elder Scrolls by unseen powers. Perhaps the fact they perform such mighty deeds and wield such powerful relics causes their names to disappear as well. That's my hypothesis.

 

 

edit: Almost forgot the Drothmeri Army. Kind of interesting that a Telvanni of all people would be the one to become sick enough of Imperial rule to oppose Helseth and the Imperials. He sure chose an interesting time to attempt an invasion as well. With the weakened state of Cyrodill as evidence during the MQ and Ocato's inability to recall legions from the other provinces, the Imperial City would have been left largely undefended, and it's possible with that relic they could have taken out the Elder Council. Personally ,I think taking out Helseth with an assassin would have been a far easier and more plausible way to reduce Imperial influence in Morrowind but this guy had his agenda and he was a bit crazy as wizards tend to be. Seems like most of the nastier villains in lore make a bee line towards White Gold Tower. That can't be only a coincidence, can it? We'll find out more in Lord of Souls about its power, I'm sure.

Nerevkiin's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/02/2014

Lady N wrote:

UESP has it as "As oiobala Umarile, Ehlnada racuvar," which translates to "by the eternal power of Umaril, the mortal gods shall be cast down." I've not checked, but that sounds right. 

I believe it was also written in Dwemer 

Proweler's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/14/2010

Bit of a misnomer that. It was first used for the Dwemer but it is elven script.

http://www.imperial-library.info/content/aldmeri-alphabets

On account of Garry Noonan its not even re-purposed, its always been elven, but I'm buggered for the actual source at the moment.